“Broadcasting live and on fire from St. Thomas More Catholic Church in Boynton Beach, we worship Christ in the great tradition of the Roman Catholic Church.

We invite our listeners to visit our St. Thomas More Catholic Church website (STMBB.ORG) where you will find many resources to bless you and your family in your Christian discipleship.

We proclaim the risen Christ and gather in fellowship with Mary, the mother of Our Lord, around the table of the Eucharist.  We pray with the Saints and seek to conform our lives with theirs in order to receive the powerful presence of Jesus Christ in Holy Communion and to be His ambassadors, Christ appealing through us to you by the means of social media. “

Pastor Harris

St. Thomas More Catholic Church


Upcoming presentations
Tuesday 13:30

Sorrowful Mysteries

Tuesday 14:00

Catholic Music

Tuesday 15:00

Rosary Of Divine Mercy

Tuesday 16:00

The Young Vatican

Tuesday 17:00

The Afternoon Prayer

Tuesday 17:30

Meditations

Tuesday 18:00

The Angelus

Tuesday 19:00

The Night Prayer

Tuesday 20:00

Holy Gospel



Now On Air

Sorrowful Mysteries

13:30 14:00


Choose a day


Morning Prayer

00:00Sunday

00:00Sunday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Gregorian Chants

01:00Sunday

01:00Sunday

[...]

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Glorious Mysteries

02:30Sunday

02:30Sunday

[...]

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Catholic Music

03:00Sunday

03:00Sunday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Holy Mass

04:00Sunday

04:00Sunday

Daily Prayer

05:00Sunday

05:00Sunday

[...]

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Morning Prayer

06:00Sunday

06:00Sunday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Holy Gospel

07:00Sunday

07:00Sunday

[...]

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Holy Mass

08:00Sunday

08:00Sunday

Holy Gospel

09:00Sunday

09:00Sunday

[...]

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Catholic Music

10:00Sunday

10:00Sunday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Holy Rosary

12:35Sunday

12:35Sunday

[...]

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Glorious Mysteries

13:30Sunday

13:30Sunday

[...]

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Catholic Music

14:00Sunday

14:00Sunday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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15:00Sunday

[...]

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The Young Vatican

16:00Sunday

16:00Sunday

[...]

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The Afternoon Prayer

17:00Sunday

17:00Sunday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Meditations

17:30Sunday

17:30Sunday

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The Angelus

18:00Sunday

18:00Sunday

SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Night Prayer

19:00Sunday

19:00Sunday

For other uses, see Compline (disambiguation). Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. The English word compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap. 42). Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Lutheran, and certain other Christian denominations with liturgical traditions prescribe Compline services. Compline tends to be a contemplative Office that emphasizes spiritual peace. In many monasteries it is the custom to begin the "Great Silence" after Compline, during which the whole community, including guests, observes silence throughout the night until the morning service the next day. Historical development[edit] This section incorporates information from the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1917. References to psalms follow the numbering system of the Septuagint, as said in the Latin of the Vulgate. The origin of Compline has given rise to considerable discussion among liturgists. In the past, general opinion ascribed the origin of this Hour to St. Benedict, in the beginning of the 6th century. But Jules Pargoire and A. Vandepitte trace its source to St. Basil. Vandepitte states that it was not in Cæsarea in 375, but in his retreat in Pontus (358-362), that Basil established Compline, which Hour did not exist prior to his time, that is, until shortly after the middle of the 4th century. Dom Plaine also traced the source of Compline back to the 4th century, finding mention of it in a passage in Eusebius and in another in St. Ambrose, and also in John Cassian.These texts bear witness to the private custom of saying a prayer before retiring to rest. If this was not the canonical Hour of Compline, it was certainly a preliminary step towards it. The same writers reject the opinion of Paulin Ladeuze and Dom Besse who believe that Compline had a place in the Rule of St. Pachomius, which would mean that it originated still earlier in the 4th century. It might be possible to reconcile these different sentiments by stating that if it be an established fact that St. Basil instituted and organized the Hour of Compline for the East, as St. Benedict did for the West, there existed as early as the days of St. Cyprian and Clement of Alexandria the custom of reciting a prayer before sleep, in which practice we find the most remote origin of our Compline Compline in the Roman Rite Pre-Vatican II It is generally thought that the Benedictine form of Compline is the earliest western order, although some scholars, such as Dom Plaine, have maintained that the Hour of Compline as found in the Roman Breviary at his time, antedated the Benedictine Office. These debates apart, Benedict's arrangement probably invested the Hour of Compline with the liturgical character and arrangement which were preserved in the Benedictine Order, and largely adopted by the Roman Church. The original form of the Benedictine Office, lacking even an antiphon for the psalms, is much simpler than its Roman counterpart, resembling more closely the Minor Hours of the day Saint Benedict first gave the Office the basic structure by which it has come to be celebrated in the West: three psalms (4, 90, and 133) (Vulgate numbering) said without antiphons, the hymn, the lesson, the versicle Kyrie eleison, the benediction, and the dismissal (RB, Chaps. 17 and 18). The Roman Office of Compline came to be richer and more complex than the simple Benedictine psalmody. A fourth psalm was added, "In te Domine speravi" (Psalm 30 in Vulgate). And perhaps at a fairly late date was added the solemn introduction of a benediction with a reading (based perhaps on the spiritual reading which, in the Rule of St. Benedict, precedes Compline: RB, Chap. 42), and the confession and absolution of faults. This is absent from parallel forms, such as that of Sarum. The distinctive character and greater solemnity of the Roman form of Compline comes from the response, In manus tuas, Domine ("Into Thy hands, O Lord")..., with the evangelical canticle Nunc Dimittis and its anthem, which is particularly characteristic. The Hour of Compline, such as it appeared in the Roman Breviary prior to the Second Vatican Council, may be divided into several parts, viz. the beginning or introduction, the psalmody, with its usual accompaniment of antiphons, the hymn, the capitulum, the response, the evangelical canticle, the prayer, and the benediction. By way of liturgical variety, the service of initium noctis may also be studied in the Celtic Liturgy, such as it is read in the Antiphonary of Bangor, its plan being set forth by Warren and by Bishop (see Bibliography, below). Current usage[edit] In the breviary of 1974 Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Hours, Compline is divided as follows: introduction, an optional examination of conscience or penitential rite, a hymn, psalmody with accompanying antiphons, scriptural reading, the responsory, the Canticle of Simeon, concluding prayer, and benediction. The final antiphon to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Salve Regina, etc.) is an essential part of the Office. Summorum Pontificum does allow Compline to be recited according to the older form. Armenian Liturgy: Hours of Peace and Rest There are two offices in the Armenian daily worship which are recited between Vespers and sleep: the Peace Hour and the Rest Hour. These are two distinct services of communal worship. It is the usage in some localities to combine these two services, with abbreviations, into a single service. The Peace Hour The Peace Hour (Armenian: Խաղաղական Ժամ khaghaghakan zham) is the office associated with compline in other Christian liturgies. In the Armenian Book of Hours, or Zhamagirk`, it is stated that the Peace Hour commemorates the Spirit of God, but also the Word of God, “when he was laid in the tomb and descended into Hades, and brought peace to the spirits.” Outline of the Peace Hour If the Song of Steps is recited: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 34:1-7: I have blessed the Lord at all times (awrhnets`its` zTēr)...; Glory to the Father (Always with Now and always... Amen.; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Song of Steps: Psalm 120:1-3: In my distress I cried (I neghout`ean imoum)...; Glory to the Father.... If the Song of Steps is not said: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen; Psalm 88:1-2 God of my salvation (Astouats p`kkout`ean imoy)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father...Amen.; Peace with all. In either case the service continues here: Psalms 4, 6, 13, 16, 43, 70, 86:16-17; Glory to the Father...; Song: Vouchsafe unto us (Shnorhea mez)...; Glory to the Father....; Acclamation: At the approach of darkness (I merdzenal erekoyis)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us give thanks to the Lord (Gohats`arouk` zTearnē)...; Prayer: Beneficent Lord (Tēr Barerar)...; Psalm 27 The Lord is my light (Tēr loys im)...; Glory to the Father...; Song: Look down with love (Nayats` sirov)...; Acclamation: Lord, do not turn your face (Tēr mi dartzouts`aner)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakal)...; Prayer: Bestowing with grace (Shnorhatou bareats`).... On non-fasting days the service ends here with: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen. On fasting days continue here: Psalm 119; Glory to the Father...; Hymn: We entreat you (I k`ez hayts`emk`).... During the Great Fast: Evening Chant (varies); Acclamation: To the spirits at rest (Hogvovn hangouts`elots`)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… For the repose of the souls (Vasn hangouts`eal)...; Lord, have mercy (thrice); Prayer: Christ, Son of God (K`ristos Ordi Astoutsoy)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen.” The Rest Hour[edit] The Rest Hour (Armenian: Հանգստեան Ժամ hangstean zham) is celebrated after the Peace Hour, and is the last of the offices of the day. It may be considered communal worship before sleep. It bears some resemblance in content to Compline in the Roman Rite. In the Armenian Book of Hours it is stated in many manuscripts that the Rest Hour commemorates God the Father, “that he protect us through the protecting arm of the Onlybegotten in the darkness of night.” Outline of the Rest Hour: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 43:3-5: Lord, send your light and your truth (Arak`ea Tēr)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Psalms 119:41-56, 119:113-120, 119:169-176, 91, 123, 54, Daniel 3:29-34, Luke 2:29-32, Psalms 142:7, 86:16-17, 138:7-8, Luke 1:46-55; Glory to the Father...; Acclamation: My soul into your hands (Andzn im I tzers k`o)...; Proclamation: And again in peace…Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakaln)...; Prayer: Lord our God (Tēr Astouats mer).... Ending: Psalm 4; Pre-gospel sequence; Gospel: John 12:24ff; Glory to you, our God; Proclamation: By the holy Cross (Sourb khach`ivs…)...; Prayer: Protect us (Pahpannea zmez)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Ending during Fasts: Acclamation: We fall down before you (Ankanimk` araji k`o)...; Meditation Twelve of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 94 of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 41 of St. Gregory of Narek; Prayer: In faith I confess (Havatov khostovanim)... by St. Nerses the Graceful; Acclamation: Through your holy spotless and virgin mother (Vasn srbouhvoy)...; Proclamation: Holy Birthgiver of God (Sourb zAstouatsatsinn), ,; Prayer: Accept, Lord (Unkal, Tēr)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Compline in Byzantine usage[edit] Compline in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches (Greek (τὸ) Ἀπόδειπνον [apóðipnon], Slavonic Povecheriye: literally the "after-supper" [prayer]) takes two distinct forms: Small Compline and Great Compline. The two versions are quite different in length. At Compline (whether Small or Great) a Canon to the Theotokos in the Tone of the Week will normally be read (these Canons will be found in the Octoechos). Services to saints in the Menaion that for various reasons cannot be celebrated on the day assigned to them, may be chanted on the nearest convenient day at Compline. In such cases, the Canon for the Saint would be read together with the Canon to the Theotokos, followed by the Stichera to the saint from Vespers. There are also particular days (such as certain Forefeasts, Afterfeasts, and days during the Pentecostarion) that have special Canons for Compline composed for them. The Office always ends with a mutual asking of forgiveness. In some traditions, most notably among the Russians, Evening Prayers (i.e., Prayers Before Sleep) will be read near the end of Compline. It is an ancient custom, practiced on the Holy Mountain and in other monasteries, for everyone present at the end of Compline to venerate the relics and icons in the church, and receive the priest's blessing. Small Compline Small Compline is served on most nights of the year (i.e., those nights on which Great Compline is not served). On the eves of Sundays and feasts with All-Night Vigil, Compline may be either read privately or suppressed altogether. Among the Greeks, who do not normally hold an All-Night Vigil on Saturday evenings, Compline is said as normal. The service is composed of three Psalms (50, 69, 142), the Small Doxology, the Nicene Creed, the Canon followed by Axion Estin,[4] the Trisagion, Troparia for the day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness and final blessing by the priest. After this, there is a Litany and the veneration of Icons and relics. Great Compline Great Compline is a penitential office which is served on the following occasions: Tuesday and Thursday nights of Cheesefare Week (the week before Great Lent) Monday through Thursday nights of Great Lent Friday nights of Great Lent Monday and Tuesday of Holy Week Monday through Friday during the lesser Lenten seasons: Nativity Fast, Apostles' Fast, and Dormition Fast The Eves of certain Great Feasts, as a part of the All-Night Vigil: Nativity, Theophany, and Annunciation. Unlike Small Compline, Great Compline has portions of the service which are chanted by the Choir and during Lent the Prayer of St. Ephraim is said with prostrations. During the First Week of Great Lent, the Great Canon of Saint Andrew of Crete is divided into four portions and read on Monday through Thursday nights. Due to the penitential nature of Great Compline, it is not uncommon for the priest to hear Confession during the service. Great Compline is composed of three sections, each beginning with the call to prayer, "O come, let us worship...": First Part Psalms[10] 4, 6, and 12; Glory..., etc.; Psalms 24, 30, 90; then the hymn "God is With Us" and troparia, the Creed, the hymn "O Most holy Lady Theotokos", the Trisagion and Troparia of the Day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Basil the Great. Second Part Psalms 50, 101, and the Prayer of Manasses; the Trisagion, and Troparia of Repentance, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Mardarius. Third Part Psalms 69, 142, and the Small Doxology; then the Canon followed by Axion Estin, the Trisagion, the hymn "O Lord of Hosts, be with us...", Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, "More honorable than the cherubim....", the Prayer of St. Ephraim, Trisagion, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness. Instead of the normal final blessing by the priest, all prostrate themselves while the priest reads a special intercessory prayer. Then the litany and the veneration of icons and relics. Anglican usage The start of Compline in the Anglo-Catholic Anglican Service Book (1991) In the Anglican tradition, Compline was originally merged with Vespers to form Evening Prayer in the Book of Common Prayer. ECUSA's Book of Offices of 1914, the Church of England's proposed Prayer Book of 1928, and the Anglican Church of Canada's Prayer Book of 1959, and also the 2004 version of the Book of Common Prayer for the Church of Ireland[, restored a form of Compline to Anglican worship. Several contemporary liturgical texts, including the American 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the Anglican Church of Canada's Book of Alternative Services, and the Church of England's Common Worship, provide modern forms of the service. A traditional form is provided in the Anglican Service Book (1991). The Common Worship service consists of the opening sentences, the confession of sins, the psalms and other Bible lessons, the canticle of Simeon, and prayers, including a benediction. There are authorised alternatives for the days of the week and the seasons of the Christian year. As a public service of worship, like Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer, Compline may be led by a layperson.  

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Holy Gospel

20:00Sunday

20:00Sunday

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Holy Mass

21:00Sunday

21:00Sunday

Vatican News 1:30 PM

22:00Sunday

22:00Sunday

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Catholic Music

23:00Sunday

23:00Sunday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Morning Prayer

00:00Monday

00:00Monday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Catholic Music

01:00Monday

01:00Monday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Joyful Mysteries

02:00Monday

02:00Monday

[...]

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Catholic Music

03:00Monday

03:00Monday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Holy Mass

04:00Monday

04:00Monday

Daily Prayer

05:00Monday

05:00Monday

[...]

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Morning Prayer

06:00Monday

06:00Monday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Holy Gospel

07:00Monday

07:00Monday

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Holy Mass

08:00Monday

08:00Monday

Holy Gospel

09:00Monday

09:00Monday

[...]

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Catholic Music

10:00Monday

10:00Monday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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General Audience

11:00Monday

11:00Monday

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The Angelus

12:20Monday

12:20Monday

SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Afternoon Prayer

13:00Monday

13:00Monday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Joyful Mysteries

13:30Monday

13:30Monday

[...]

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Catholic Music

14:00Monday

14:00Monday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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15:00Monday

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The Young Vatican

16:00Monday

16:00Monday

[...]

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The Afternoon Prayer

17:00Monday

17:00Monday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Meditations

17:30Monday

17:30Monday

[...]

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The Angelus

18:00Monday

18:00Monday

SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Night Prayer

19:00Monday

19:00Monday

For other uses, see Compline (disambiguation). Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. The English word compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap. 42). Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Lutheran, and certain other Christian denominations with liturgical traditions prescribe Compline services. Compline tends to be a contemplative Office that emphasizes spiritual peace. In many monasteries it is the custom to begin the "Great Silence" after Compline, during which the whole community, including guests, observes silence throughout the night until the morning service the next day. Historical development[edit] This section incorporates information from the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1917. References to psalms follow the numbering system of the Septuagint, as said in the Latin of the Vulgate. The origin of Compline has given rise to considerable discussion among liturgists. In the past, general opinion ascribed the origin of this Hour to St. Benedict, in the beginning of the 6th century. But Jules Pargoire and A. Vandepitte trace its source to St. Basil. Vandepitte states that it was not in Cæsarea in 375, but in his retreat in Pontus (358-362), that Basil established Compline, which Hour did not exist prior to his time, that is, until shortly after the middle of the 4th century. Dom Plaine also traced the source of Compline back to the 4th century, finding mention of it in a passage in Eusebius and in another in St. Ambrose, and also in John Cassian.These texts bear witness to the private custom of saying a prayer before retiring to rest. If this was not the canonical Hour of Compline, it was certainly a preliminary step towards it. The same writers reject the opinion of Paulin Ladeuze and Dom Besse who believe that Compline had a place in the Rule of St. Pachomius, which would mean that it originated still earlier in the 4th century. It might be possible to reconcile these different sentiments by stating that if it be an established fact that St. Basil instituted and organized the Hour of Compline for the East, as St. Benedict did for the West, there existed as early as the days of St. Cyprian and Clement of Alexandria the custom of reciting a prayer before sleep, in which practice we find the most remote origin of our Compline Compline in the Roman Rite Pre-Vatican II It is generally thought that the Benedictine form of Compline is the earliest western order, although some scholars, such as Dom Plaine, have maintained that the Hour of Compline as found in the Roman Breviary at his time, antedated the Benedictine Office. These debates apart, Benedict's arrangement probably invested the Hour of Compline with the liturgical character and arrangement which were preserved in the Benedictine Order, and largely adopted by the Roman Church. The original form of the Benedictine Office, lacking even an antiphon for the psalms, is much simpler than its Roman counterpart, resembling more closely the Minor Hours of the day Saint Benedict first gave the Office the basic structure by which it has come to be celebrated in the West: three psalms (4, 90, and 133) (Vulgate numbering) said without antiphons, the hymn, the lesson, the versicle Kyrie eleison, the benediction, and the dismissal (RB, Chaps. 17 and 18). The Roman Office of Compline came to be richer and more complex than the simple Benedictine psalmody. A fourth psalm was added, "In te Domine speravi" (Psalm 30 in Vulgate). And perhaps at a fairly late date was added the solemn introduction of a benediction with a reading (based perhaps on the spiritual reading which, in the Rule of St. Benedict, precedes Compline: RB, Chap. 42), and the confession and absolution of faults. This is absent from parallel forms, such as that of Sarum. The distinctive character and greater solemnity of the Roman form of Compline comes from the response, In manus tuas, Domine ("Into Thy hands, O Lord")..., with the evangelical canticle Nunc Dimittis and its anthem, which is particularly characteristic. The Hour of Compline, such as it appeared in the Roman Breviary prior to the Second Vatican Council, may be divided into several parts, viz. the beginning or introduction, the psalmody, with its usual accompaniment of antiphons, the hymn, the capitulum, the response, the evangelical canticle, the prayer, and the benediction. By way of liturgical variety, the service of initium noctis may also be studied in the Celtic Liturgy, such as it is read in the Antiphonary of Bangor, its plan being set forth by Warren and by Bishop (see Bibliography, below). Current usage[edit] In the breviary of 1974 Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Hours, Compline is divided as follows: introduction, an optional examination of conscience or penitential rite, a hymn, psalmody with accompanying antiphons, scriptural reading, the responsory, the Canticle of Simeon, concluding prayer, and benediction. The final antiphon to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Salve Regina, etc.) is an essential part of the Office. Summorum Pontificum does allow Compline to be recited according to the older form. Armenian Liturgy: Hours of Peace and Rest There are two offices in the Armenian daily worship which are recited between Vespers and sleep: the Peace Hour and the Rest Hour. These are two distinct services of communal worship. It is the usage in some localities to combine these two services, with abbreviations, into a single service. The Peace Hour The Peace Hour (Armenian: Խաղաղական Ժամ khaghaghakan zham) is the office associated with compline in other Christian liturgies. In the Armenian Book of Hours, or Zhamagirk`, it is stated that the Peace Hour commemorates the Spirit of God, but also the Word of God, “when he was laid in the tomb and descended into Hades, and brought peace to the spirits.” Outline of the Peace Hour If the Song of Steps is recited: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 34:1-7: I have blessed the Lord at all times (awrhnets`its` zTēr)...; Glory to the Father (Always with Now and always... Amen.; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Song of Steps: Psalm 120:1-3: In my distress I cried (I neghout`ean imoum)...; Glory to the Father.... If the Song of Steps is not said: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen; Psalm 88:1-2 God of my salvation (Astouats p`kkout`ean imoy)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father...Amen.; Peace with all. In either case the service continues here: Psalms 4, 6, 13, 16, 43, 70, 86:16-17; Glory to the Father...; Song: Vouchsafe unto us (Shnorhea mez)...; Glory to the Father....; Acclamation: At the approach of darkness (I merdzenal erekoyis)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us give thanks to the Lord (Gohats`arouk` zTearnē)...; Prayer: Beneficent Lord (Tēr Barerar)...; Psalm 27 The Lord is my light (Tēr loys im)...; Glory to the Father...; Song: Look down with love (Nayats` sirov)...; Acclamation: Lord, do not turn your face (Tēr mi dartzouts`aner)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakal)...; Prayer: Bestowing with grace (Shnorhatou bareats`).... On non-fasting days the service ends here with: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen. On fasting days continue here: Psalm 119; Glory to the Father...; Hymn: We entreat you (I k`ez hayts`emk`).... During the Great Fast: Evening Chant (varies); Acclamation: To the spirits at rest (Hogvovn hangouts`elots`)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… For the repose of the souls (Vasn hangouts`eal)...; Lord, have mercy (thrice); Prayer: Christ, Son of God (K`ristos Ordi Astoutsoy)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen.” The Rest Hour[edit] The Rest Hour (Armenian: Հանգստեան Ժամ hangstean zham) is celebrated after the Peace Hour, and is the last of the offices of the day. It may be considered communal worship before sleep. It bears some resemblance in content to Compline in the Roman Rite. In the Armenian Book of Hours it is stated in many manuscripts that the Rest Hour commemorates God the Father, “that he protect us through the protecting arm of the Onlybegotten in the darkness of night.” Outline of the Rest Hour: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 43:3-5: Lord, send your light and your truth (Arak`ea Tēr)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Psalms 119:41-56, 119:113-120, 119:169-176, 91, 123, 54, Daniel 3:29-34, Luke 2:29-32, Psalms 142:7, 86:16-17, 138:7-8, Luke 1:46-55; Glory to the Father...; Acclamation: My soul into your hands (Andzn im I tzers k`o)...; Proclamation: And again in peace…Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakaln)...; Prayer: Lord our God (Tēr Astouats mer).... Ending: Psalm 4; Pre-gospel sequence; Gospel: John 12:24ff; Glory to you, our God; Proclamation: By the holy Cross (Sourb khach`ivs…)...; Prayer: Protect us (Pahpannea zmez)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Ending during Fasts: Acclamation: We fall down before you (Ankanimk` araji k`o)...; Meditation Twelve of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 94 of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 41 of St. Gregory of Narek; Prayer: In faith I confess (Havatov khostovanim)... by St. Nerses the Graceful; Acclamation: Through your holy spotless and virgin mother (Vasn srbouhvoy)...; Proclamation: Holy Birthgiver of God (Sourb zAstouatsatsinn), ,; Prayer: Accept, Lord (Unkal, Tēr)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Compline in Byzantine usage[edit] Compline in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches (Greek (τὸ) Ἀπόδειπνον [apóðipnon], Slavonic Povecheriye: literally the "after-supper" [prayer]) takes two distinct forms: Small Compline and Great Compline. The two versions are quite different in length. At Compline (whether Small or Great) a Canon to the Theotokos in the Tone of the Week will normally be read (these Canons will be found in the Octoechos). Services to saints in the Menaion that for various reasons cannot be celebrated on the day assigned to them, may be chanted on the nearest convenient day at Compline. In such cases, the Canon for the Saint would be read together with the Canon to the Theotokos, followed by the Stichera to the saint from Vespers. There are also particular days (such as certain Forefeasts, Afterfeasts, and days during the Pentecostarion) that have special Canons for Compline composed for them. The Office always ends with a mutual asking of forgiveness. In some traditions, most notably among the Russians, Evening Prayers (i.e., Prayers Before Sleep) will be read near the end of Compline. It is an ancient custom, practiced on the Holy Mountain and in other monasteries, for everyone present at the end of Compline to venerate the relics and icons in the church, and receive the priest's blessing. Small Compline Small Compline is served on most nights of the year (i.e., those nights on which Great Compline is not served). On the eves of Sundays and feasts with All-Night Vigil, Compline may be either read privately or suppressed altogether. Among the Greeks, who do not normally hold an All-Night Vigil on Saturday evenings, Compline is said as normal. The service is composed of three Psalms (50, 69, 142), the Small Doxology, the Nicene Creed, the Canon followed by Axion Estin,[4] the Trisagion, Troparia for the day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness and final blessing by the priest. After this, there is a Litany and the veneration of Icons and relics. Great Compline Great Compline is a penitential office which is served on the following occasions: Tuesday and Thursday nights of Cheesefare Week (the week before Great Lent) Monday through Thursday nights of Great Lent Friday nights of Great Lent Monday and Tuesday of Holy Week Monday through Friday during the lesser Lenten seasons: Nativity Fast, Apostles' Fast, and Dormition Fast The Eves of certain Great Feasts, as a part of the All-Night Vigil: Nativity, Theophany, and Annunciation. Unlike Small Compline, Great Compline has portions of the service which are chanted by the Choir and during Lent the Prayer of St. Ephraim is said with prostrations. During the First Week of Great Lent, the Great Canon of Saint Andrew of Crete is divided into four portions and read on Monday through Thursday nights. Due to the penitential nature of Great Compline, it is not uncommon for the priest to hear Confession during the service. Great Compline is composed of three sections, each beginning with the call to prayer, "O come, let us worship...": First Part Psalms[10] 4, 6, and 12; Glory..., etc.; Psalms 24, 30, 90; then the hymn "God is With Us" and troparia, the Creed, the hymn "O Most holy Lady Theotokos", the Trisagion and Troparia of the Day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Basil the Great. Second Part Psalms 50, 101, and the Prayer of Manasses; the Trisagion, and Troparia of Repentance, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Mardarius. Third Part Psalms 69, 142, and the Small Doxology; then the Canon followed by Axion Estin, the Trisagion, the hymn "O Lord of Hosts, be with us...", Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, "More honorable than the cherubim....", the Prayer of St. Ephraim, Trisagion, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness. Instead of the normal final blessing by the priest, all prostrate themselves while the priest reads a special intercessory prayer. Then the litany and the veneration of icons and relics. Anglican usage The start of Compline in the Anglo-Catholic Anglican Service Book (1991) In the Anglican tradition, Compline was originally merged with Vespers to form Evening Prayer in the Book of Common Prayer. ECUSA's Book of Offices of 1914, the Church of England's proposed Prayer Book of 1928, and the Anglican Church of Canada's Prayer Book of 1959, and also the 2004 version of the Book of Common Prayer for the Church of Ireland[, restored a form of Compline to Anglican worship. Several contemporary liturgical texts, including the American 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the Anglican Church of Canada's Book of Alternative Services, and the Church of England's Common Worship, provide modern forms of the service. A traditional form is provided in the Anglican Service Book (1991). The Common Worship service consists of the opening sentences, the confession of sins, the psalms and other Bible lessons, the canticle of Simeon, and prayers, including a benediction. There are authorised alternatives for the days of the week and the seasons of the Christian year. As a public service of worship, like Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer, Compline may be led by a layperson.  

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Holy Gospel

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Holy Mass

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Vatican News 1:30 PM

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Catholic Music

23:00Monday

23:00Monday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Morning Prayer

00:00Tuesday

00:00Tuesday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Catholic Music

01:00Tuesday

01:00Tuesday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Sorrowful Mysteries

02:00Tuesday

02:00Tuesday

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Catholic Music

03:00Tuesday

03:00Tuesday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Holy Mass

04:00Tuesday

04:00Tuesday

Daily Prayer

05:00Tuesday

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Morning Prayer

06:00Tuesday

06:00Tuesday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Holy Gospel

07:00Tuesday

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Holy Mass

08:00Tuesday

08:00Tuesday

Holy Gospel

09:00Tuesday

09:00Tuesday

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Catholic Music

10:00Tuesday

10:00Tuesday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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General Audience

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The Angelus

12:25Tuesday

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SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Afternoon Prayer

13:00Tuesday

13:00Tuesday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Sorrowful Mysteries

13:30Tuesday

13:30Tuesday

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Catholic Music

14:00Tuesday

14:00Tuesday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Rosary Of Divine Mercy

15:00Tuesday

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The Young Vatican

16:00Tuesday

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The Afternoon Prayer

17:00Tuesday

17:00Tuesday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Meditations

17:30Tuesday

17:30Tuesday

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The Angelus

18:00Tuesday

18:00Tuesday

SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Night Prayer

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For other uses, see Compline (disambiguation). Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. The English word compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap. 42). Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Lutheran, and certain other Christian denominations with liturgical traditions prescribe Compline services. Compline tends to be a contemplative Office that emphasizes spiritual peace. In many monasteries it is the custom to begin the "Great Silence" after Compline, during which the whole community, including guests, observes silence throughout the night until the morning service the next day. Historical development[edit] This section incorporates information from the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1917. References to psalms follow the numbering system of the Septuagint, as said in the Latin of the Vulgate. The origin of Compline has given rise to considerable discussion among liturgists. In the past, general opinion ascribed the origin of this Hour to St. Benedict, in the beginning of the 6th century. But Jules Pargoire and A. Vandepitte trace its source to St. Basil. Vandepitte states that it was not in Cæsarea in 375, but in his retreat in Pontus (358-362), that Basil established Compline, which Hour did not exist prior to his time, that is, until shortly after the middle of the 4th century. Dom Plaine also traced the source of Compline back to the 4th century, finding mention of it in a passage in Eusebius and in another in St. Ambrose, and also in John Cassian.These texts bear witness to the private custom of saying a prayer before retiring to rest. If this was not the canonical Hour of Compline, it was certainly a preliminary step towards it. The same writers reject the opinion of Paulin Ladeuze and Dom Besse who believe that Compline had a place in the Rule of St. Pachomius, which would mean that it originated still earlier in the 4th century. It might be possible to reconcile these different sentiments by stating that if it be an established fact that St. Basil instituted and organized the Hour of Compline for the East, as St. Benedict did for the West, there existed as early as the days of St. Cyprian and Clement of Alexandria the custom of reciting a prayer before sleep, in which practice we find the most remote origin of our Compline Compline in the Roman Rite Pre-Vatican II It is generally thought that the Benedictine form of Compline is the earliest western order, although some scholars, such as Dom Plaine, have maintained that the Hour of Compline as found in the Roman Breviary at his time, antedated the Benedictine Office. These debates apart, Benedict's arrangement probably invested the Hour of Compline with the liturgical character and arrangement which were preserved in the Benedictine Order, and largely adopted by the Roman Church. The original form of the Benedictine Office, lacking even an antiphon for the psalms, is much simpler than its Roman counterpart, resembling more closely the Minor Hours of the day Saint Benedict first gave the Office the basic structure by which it has come to be celebrated in the West: three psalms (4, 90, and 133) (Vulgate numbering) said without antiphons, the hymn, the lesson, the versicle Kyrie eleison, the benediction, and the dismissal (RB, Chaps. 17 and 18). The Roman Office of Compline came to be richer and more complex than the simple Benedictine psalmody. A fourth psalm was added, "In te Domine speravi" (Psalm 30 in Vulgate). And perhaps at a fairly late date was added the solemn introduction of a benediction with a reading (based perhaps on the spiritual reading which, in the Rule of St. Benedict, precedes Compline: RB, Chap. 42), and the confession and absolution of faults. This is absent from parallel forms, such as that of Sarum. The distinctive character and greater solemnity of the Roman form of Compline comes from the response, In manus tuas, Domine ("Into Thy hands, O Lord")..., with the evangelical canticle Nunc Dimittis and its anthem, which is particularly characteristic. The Hour of Compline, such as it appeared in the Roman Breviary prior to the Second Vatican Council, may be divided into several parts, viz. the beginning or introduction, the psalmody, with its usual accompaniment of antiphons, the hymn, the capitulum, the response, the evangelical canticle, the prayer, and the benediction. By way of liturgical variety, the service of initium noctis may also be studied in the Celtic Liturgy, such as it is read in the Antiphonary of Bangor, its plan being set forth by Warren and by Bishop (see Bibliography, below). Current usage[edit] In the breviary of 1974 Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Hours, Compline is divided as follows: introduction, an optional examination of conscience or penitential rite, a hymn, psalmody with accompanying antiphons, scriptural reading, the responsory, the Canticle of Simeon, concluding prayer, and benediction. The final antiphon to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Salve Regina, etc.) is an essential part of the Office. Summorum Pontificum does allow Compline to be recited according to the older form. Armenian Liturgy: Hours of Peace and Rest There are two offices in the Armenian daily worship which are recited between Vespers and sleep: the Peace Hour and the Rest Hour. These are two distinct services of communal worship. It is the usage in some localities to combine these two services, with abbreviations, into a single service. The Peace Hour The Peace Hour (Armenian: Խաղաղական Ժամ khaghaghakan zham) is the office associated with compline in other Christian liturgies. In the Armenian Book of Hours, or Zhamagirk`, it is stated that the Peace Hour commemorates the Spirit of God, but also the Word of God, “when he was laid in the tomb and descended into Hades, and brought peace to the spirits.” Outline of the Peace Hour If the Song of Steps is recited: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 34:1-7: I have blessed the Lord at all times (awrhnets`its` zTēr)...; Glory to the Father (Always with Now and always... Amen.; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Song of Steps: Psalm 120:1-3: In my distress I cried (I neghout`ean imoum)...; Glory to the Father.... If the Song of Steps is not said: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen; Psalm 88:1-2 God of my salvation (Astouats p`kkout`ean imoy)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father...Amen.; Peace with all. In either case the service continues here: Psalms 4, 6, 13, 16, 43, 70, 86:16-17; Glory to the Father...; Song: Vouchsafe unto us (Shnorhea mez)...; Glory to the Father....; Acclamation: At the approach of darkness (I merdzenal erekoyis)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us give thanks to the Lord (Gohats`arouk` zTearnē)...; Prayer: Beneficent Lord (Tēr Barerar)...; Psalm 27 The Lord is my light (Tēr loys im)...; Glory to the Father...; Song: Look down with love (Nayats` sirov)...; Acclamation: Lord, do not turn your face (Tēr mi dartzouts`aner)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakal)...; Prayer: Bestowing with grace (Shnorhatou bareats`).... On non-fasting days the service ends here with: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen. On fasting days continue here: Psalm 119; Glory to the Father...; Hymn: We entreat you (I k`ez hayts`emk`).... During the Great Fast: Evening Chant (varies); Acclamation: To the spirits at rest (Hogvovn hangouts`elots`)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… For the repose of the souls (Vasn hangouts`eal)...; Lord, have mercy (thrice); Prayer: Christ, Son of God (K`ristos Ordi Astoutsoy)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen.” The Rest Hour[edit] The Rest Hour (Armenian: Հանգստեան Ժամ hangstean zham) is celebrated after the Peace Hour, and is the last of the offices of the day. It may be considered communal worship before sleep. It bears some resemblance in content to Compline in the Roman Rite. In the Armenian Book of Hours it is stated in many manuscripts that the Rest Hour commemorates God the Father, “that he protect us through the protecting arm of the Onlybegotten in the darkness of night.” Outline of the Rest Hour: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 43:3-5: Lord, send your light and your truth (Arak`ea Tēr)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Psalms 119:41-56, 119:113-120, 119:169-176, 91, 123, 54, Daniel 3:29-34, Luke 2:29-32, Psalms 142:7, 86:16-17, 138:7-8, Luke 1:46-55; Glory to the Father...; Acclamation: My soul into your hands (Andzn im I tzers k`o)...; Proclamation: And again in peace…Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakaln)...; Prayer: Lord our God (Tēr Astouats mer).... Ending: Psalm 4; Pre-gospel sequence; Gospel: John 12:24ff; Glory to you, our God; Proclamation: By the holy Cross (Sourb khach`ivs…)...; Prayer: Protect us (Pahpannea zmez)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Ending during Fasts: Acclamation: We fall down before you (Ankanimk` araji k`o)...; Meditation Twelve of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 94 of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 41 of St. Gregory of Narek; Prayer: In faith I confess (Havatov khostovanim)... by St. Nerses the Graceful; Acclamation: Through your holy spotless and virgin mother (Vasn srbouhvoy)...; Proclamation: Holy Birthgiver of God (Sourb zAstouatsatsinn), ,; Prayer: Accept, Lord (Unkal, Tēr)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Compline in Byzantine usage[edit] Compline in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches (Greek (τὸ) Ἀπόδειπνον [apóðipnon], Slavonic Povecheriye: literally the "after-supper" [prayer]) takes two distinct forms: Small Compline and Great Compline. The two versions are quite different in length. At Compline (whether Small or Great) a Canon to the Theotokos in the Tone of the Week will normally be read (these Canons will be found in the Octoechos). Services to saints in the Menaion that for various reasons cannot be celebrated on the day assigned to them, may be chanted on the nearest convenient day at Compline. In such cases, the Canon for the Saint would be read together with the Canon to the Theotokos, followed by the Stichera to the saint from Vespers. There are also particular days (such as certain Forefeasts, Afterfeasts, and days during the Pentecostarion) that have special Canons for Compline composed for them. The Office always ends with a mutual asking of forgiveness. In some traditions, most notably among the Russians, Evening Prayers (i.e., Prayers Before Sleep) will be read near the end of Compline. It is an ancient custom, practiced on the Holy Mountain and in other monasteries, for everyone present at the end of Compline to venerate the relics and icons in the church, and receive the priest's blessing. Small Compline Small Compline is served on most nights of the year (i.e., those nights on which Great Compline is not served). On the eves of Sundays and feasts with All-Night Vigil, Compline may be either read privately or suppressed altogether. Among the Greeks, who do not normally hold an All-Night Vigil on Saturday evenings, Compline is said as normal. The service is composed of three Psalms (50, 69, 142), the Small Doxology, the Nicene Creed, the Canon followed by Axion Estin,[4] the Trisagion, Troparia for the day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness and final blessing by the priest. After this, there is a Litany and the veneration of Icons and relics. Great Compline Great Compline is a penitential office which is served on the following occasions: Tuesday and Thursday nights of Cheesefare Week (the week before Great Lent) Monday through Thursday nights of Great Lent Friday nights of Great Lent Monday and Tuesday of Holy Week Monday through Friday during the lesser Lenten seasons: Nativity Fast, Apostles' Fast, and Dormition Fast The Eves of certain Great Feasts, as a part of the All-Night Vigil: Nativity, Theophany, and Annunciation. Unlike Small Compline, Great Compline has portions of the service which are chanted by the Choir and during Lent the Prayer of St. Ephraim is said with prostrations. During the First Week of Great Lent, the Great Canon of Saint Andrew of Crete is divided into four portions and read on Monday through Thursday nights. Due to the penitential nature of Great Compline, it is not uncommon for the priest to hear Confession during the service. Great Compline is composed of three sections, each beginning with the call to prayer, "O come, let us worship...": First Part Psalms[10] 4, 6, and 12; Glory..., etc.; Psalms 24, 30, 90; then the hymn "God is With Us" and troparia, the Creed, the hymn "O Most holy Lady Theotokos", the Trisagion and Troparia of the Day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Basil the Great. Second Part Psalms 50, 101, and the Prayer of Manasses; the Trisagion, and Troparia of Repentance, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Mardarius. Third Part Psalms 69, 142, and the Small Doxology; then the Canon followed by Axion Estin, the Trisagion, the hymn "O Lord of Hosts, be with us...", Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, "More honorable than the cherubim....", the Prayer of St. Ephraim, Trisagion, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness. Instead of the normal final blessing by the priest, all prostrate themselves while the priest reads a special intercessory prayer. Then the litany and the veneration of icons and relics. Anglican usage The start of Compline in the Anglo-Catholic Anglican Service Book (1991) In the Anglican tradition, Compline was originally merged with Vespers to form Evening Prayer in the Book of Common Prayer. ECUSA's Book of Offices of 1914, the Church of England's proposed Prayer Book of 1928, and the Anglican Church of Canada's Prayer Book of 1959, and also the 2004 version of the Book of Common Prayer for the Church of Ireland[, restored a form of Compline to Anglican worship. Several contemporary liturgical texts, including the American 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the Anglican Church of Canada's Book of Alternative Services, and the Church of England's Common Worship, provide modern forms of the service. A traditional form is provided in the Anglican Service Book (1991). The Common Worship service consists of the opening sentences, the confession of sins, the psalms and other Bible lessons, the canticle of Simeon, and prayers, including a benediction. There are authorised alternatives for the days of the week and the seasons of the Christian year. As a public service of worship, like Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer, Compline may be led by a layperson.  

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Holy Gospel

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Holy Mass

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Vatican News 1:30 PM

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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Morning Prayer

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In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Glorious Mysteries

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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Holy Mass

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Daily Prayer

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Morning Prayer

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In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Holy Gospel

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Holy Mass

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Holy Gospel

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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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General Audience

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The Angelus

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SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Afternoon Prayer

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Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Glorious Mysteries

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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Rosary Of Divine Mercy

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The Young Vatican

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The Afternoon Prayer

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Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Meditations

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The Angelus

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SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Night Prayer

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For other uses, see Compline (disambiguation). Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. The English word compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap. 42). Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Lutheran, and certain other Christian denominations with liturgical traditions prescribe Compline services. Compline tends to be a contemplative Office that emphasizes spiritual peace. In many monasteries it is the custom to begin the "Great Silence" after Compline, during which the whole community, including guests, observes silence throughout the night until the morning service the next day. Historical development[edit] This section incorporates information from the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1917. References to psalms follow the numbering system of the Septuagint, as said in the Latin of the Vulgate. The origin of Compline has given rise to considerable discussion among liturgists. In the past, general opinion ascribed the origin of this Hour to St. Benedict, in the beginning of the 6th century. But Jules Pargoire and A. Vandepitte trace its source to St. Basil. Vandepitte states that it was not in Cæsarea in 375, but in his retreat in Pontus (358-362), that Basil established Compline, which Hour did not exist prior to his time, that is, until shortly after the middle of the 4th century. Dom Plaine also traced the source of Compline back to the 4th century, finding mention of it in a passage in Eusebius and in another in St. Ambrose, and also in John Cassian.These texts bear witness to the private custom of saying a prayer before retiring to rest. If this was not the canonical Hour of Compline, it was certainly a preliminary step towards it. The same writers reject the opinion of Paulin Ladeuze and Dom Besse who believe that Compline had a place in the Rule of St. Pachomius, which would mean that it originated still earlier in the 4th century. It might be possible to reconcile these different sentiments by stating that if it be an established fact that St. Basil instituted and organized the Hour of Compline for the East, as St. Benedict did for the West, there existed as early as the days of St. Cyprian and Clement of Alexandria the custom of reciting a prayer before sleep, in which practice we find the most remote origin of our Compline Compline in the Roman Rite Pre-Vatican II It is generally thought that the Benedictine form of Compline is the earliest western order, although some scholars, such as Dom Plaine, have maintained that the Hour of Compline as found in the Roman Breviary at his time, antedated the Benedictine Office. These debates apart, Benedict's arrangement probably invested the Hour of Compline with the liturgical character and arrangement which were preserved in the Benedictine Order, and largely adopted by the Roman Church. The original form of the Benedictine Office, lacking even an antiphon for the psalms, is much simpler than its Roman counterpart, resembling more closely the Minor Hours of the day Saint Benedict first gave the Office the basic structure by which it has come to be celebrated in the West: three psalms (4, 90, and 133) (Vulgate numbering) said without antiphons, the hymn, the lesson, the versicle Kyrie eleison, the benediction, and the dismissal (RB, Chaps. 17 and 18). The Roman Office of Compline came to be richer and more complex than the simple Benedictine psalmody. A fourth psalm was added, "In te Domine speravi" (Psalm 30 in Vulgate). And perhaps at a fairly late date was added the solemn introduction of a benediction with a reading (based perhaps on the spiritual reading which, in the Rule of St. Benedict, precedes Compline: RB, Chap. 42), and the confession and absolution of faults. This is absent from parallel forms, such as that of Sarum. The distinctive character and greater solemnity of the Roman form of Compline comes from the response, In manus tuas, Domine ("Into Thy hands, O Lord")..., with the evangelical canticle Nunc Dimittis and its anthem, which is particularly characteristic. The Hour of Compline, such as it appeared in the Roman Breviary prior to the Second Vatican Council, may be divided into several parts, viz. the beginning or introduction, the psalmody, with its usual accompaniment of antiphons, the hymn, the capitulum, the response, the evangelical canticle, the prayer, and the benediction. By way of liturgical variety, the service of initium noctis may also be studied in the Celtic Liturgy, such as it is read in the Antiphonary of Bangor, its plan being set forth by Warren and by Bishop (see Bibliography, below). Current usage[edit] In the breviary of 1974 Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Hours, Compline is divided as follows: introduction, an optional examination of conscience or penitential rite, a hymn, psalmody with accompanying antiphons, scriptural reading, the responsory, the Canticle of Simeon, concluding prayer, and benediction. The final antiphon to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Salve Regina, etc.) is an essential part of the Office. Summorum Pontificum does allow Compline to be recited according to the older form. Armenian Liturgy: Hours of Peace and Rest There are two offices in the Armenian daily worship which are recited between Vespers and sleep: the Peace Hour and the Rest Hour. These are two distinct services of communal worship. It is the usage in some localities to combine these two services, with abbreviations, into a single service. The Peace Hour The Peace Hour (Armenian: Խաղաղական Ժամ khaghaghakan zham) is the office associated with compline in other Christian liturgies. In the Armenian Book of Hours, or Zhamagirk`, it is stated that the Peace Hour commemorates the Spirit of God, but also the Word of God, “when he was laid in the tomb and descended into Hades, and brought peace to the spirits.” Outline of the Peace Hour If the Song of Steps is recited: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 34:1-7: I have blessed the Lord at all times (awrhnets`its` zTēr)...; Glory to the Father (Always with Now and always... Amen.; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Song of Steps: Psalm 120:1-3: In my distress I cried (I neghout`ean imoum)...; Glory to the Father.... If the Song of Steps is not said: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen; Psalm 88:1-2 God of my salvation (Astouats p`kkout`ean imoy)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father...Amen.; Peace with all. In either case the service continues here: Psalms 4, 6, 13, 16, 43, 70, 86:16-17; Glory to the Father...; Song: Vouchsafe unto us (Shnorhea mez)...; Glory to the Father....; Acclamation: At the approach of darkness (I merdzenal erekoyis)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us give thanks to the Lord (Gohats`arouk` zTearnē)...; Prayer: Beneficent Lord (Tēr Barerar)...; Psalm 27 The Lord is my light (Tēr loys im)...; Glory to the Father...; Song: Look down with love (Nayats` sirov)...; Acclamation: Lord, do not turn your face (Tēr mi dartzouts`aner)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakal)...; Prayer: Bestowing with grace (Shnorhatou bareats`).... On non-fasting days the service ends here with: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen. On fasting days continue here: Psalm 119; Glory to the Father...; Hymn: We entreat you (I k`ez hayts`emk`).... During the Great Fast: Evening Chant (varies); Acclamation: To the spirits at rest (Hogvovn hangouts`elots`)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… For the repose of the souls (Vasn hangouts`eal)...; Lord, have mercy (thrice); Prayer: Christ, Son of God (K`ristos Ordi Astoutsoy)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen.” The Rest Hour[edit] The Rest Hour (Armenian: Հանգստեան Ժամ hangstean zham) is celebrated after the Peace Hour, and is the last of the offices of the day. It may be considered communal worship before sleep. It bears some resemblance in content to Compline in the Roman Rite. In the Armenian Book of Hours it is stated in many manuscripts that the Rest Hour commemorates God the Father, “that he protect us through the protecting arm of the Onlybegotten in the darkness of night.” Outline of the Rest Hour: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 43:3-5: Lord, send your light and your truth (Arak`ea Tēr)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Psalms 119:41-56, 119:113-120, 119:169-176, 91, 123, 54, Daniel 3:29-34, Luke 2:29-32, Psalms 142:7, 86:16-17, 138:7-8, Luke 1:46-55; Glory to the Father...; Acclamation: My soul into your hands (Andzn im I tzers k`o)...; Proclamation: And again in peace…Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakaln)...; Prayer: Lord our God (Tēr Astouats mer).... Ending: Psalm 4; Pre-gospel sequence; Gospel: John 12:24ff; Glory to you, our God; Proclamation: By the holy Cross (Sourb khach`ivs…)...; Prayer: Protect us (Pahpannea zmez)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Ending during Fasts: Acclamation: We fall down before you (Ankanimk` araji k`o)...; Meditation Twelve of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 94 of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 41 of St. Gregory of Narek; Prayer: In faith I confess (Havatov khostovanim)... by St. Nerses the Graceful; Acclamation: Through your holy spotless and virgin mother (Vasn srbouhvoy)...; Proclamation: Holy Birthgiver of God (Sourb zAstouatsatsinn), ,; Prayer: Accept, Lord (Unkal, Tēr)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Compline in Byzantine usage[edit] Compline in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches (Greek (τὸ) Ἀπόδειπνον [apóðipnon], Slavonic Povecheriye: literally the "after-supper" [prayer]) takes two distinct forms: Small Compline and Great Compline. The two versions are quite different in length. At Compline (whether Small or Great) a Canon to the Theotokos in the Tone of the Week will normally be read (these Canons will be found in the Octoechos). Services to saints in the Menaion that for various reasons cannot be celebrated on the day assigned to them, may be chanted on the nearest convenient day at Compline. In such cases, the Canon for the Saint would be read together with the Canon to the Theotokos, followed by the Stichera to the saint from Vespers. There are also particular days (such as certain Forefeasts, Afterfeasts, and days during the Pentecostarion) that have special Canons for Compline composed for them. The Office always ends with a mutual asking of forgiveness. In some traditions, most notably among the Russians, Evening Prayers (i.e., Prayers Before Sleep) will be read near the end of Compline. It is an ancient custom, practiced on the Holy Mountain and in other monasteries, for everyone present at the end of Compline to venerate the relics and icons in the church, and receive the priest's blessing. Small Compline Small Compline is served on most nights of the year (i.e., those nights on which Great Compline is not served). On the eves of Sundays and feasts with All-Night Vigil, Compline may be either read privately or suppressed altogether. Among the Greeks, who do not normally hold an All-Night Vigil on Saturday evenings, Compline is said as normal. The service is composed of three Psalms (50, 69, 142), the Small Doxology, the Nicene Creed, the Canon followed by Axion Estin,[4] the Trisagion, Troparia for the day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness and final blessing by the priest. After this, there is a Litany and the veneration of Icons and relics. Great Compline Great Compline is a penitential office which is served on the following occasions: Tuesday and Thursday nights of Cheesefare Week (the week before Great Lent) Monday through Thursday nights of Great Lent Friday nights of Great Lent Monday and Tuesday of Holy Week Monday through Friday during the lesser Lenten seasons: Nativity Fast, Apostles' Fast, and Dormition Fast The Eves of certain Great Feasts, as a part of the All-Night Vigil: Nativity, Theophany, and Annunciation. Unlike Small Compline, Great Compline has portions of the service which are chanted by the Choir and during Lent the Prayer of St. Ephraim is said with prostrations. During the First Week of Great Lent, the Great Canon of Saint Andrew of Crete is divided into four portions and read on Monday through Thursday nights. Due to the penitential nature of Great Compline, it is not uncommon for the priest to hear Confession during the service. Great Compline is composed of three sections, each beginning with the call to prayer, "O come, let us worship...": First Part Psalms[10] 4, 6, and 12; Glory..., etc.; Psalms 24, 30, 90; then the hymn "God is With Us" and troparia, the Creed, the hymn "O Most holy Lady Theotokos", the Trisagion and Troparia of the Day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Basil the Great. Second Part Psalms 50, 101, and the Prayer of Manasses; the Trisagion, and Troparia of Repentance, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Mardarius. Third Part Psalms 69, 142, and the Small Doxology; then the Canon followed by Axion Estin, the Trisagion, the hymn "O Lord of Hosts, be with us...", Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, "More honorable than the cherubim....", the Prayer of St. Ephraim, Trisagion, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness. Instead of the normal final blessing by the priest, all prostrate themselves while the priest reads a special intercessory prayer. Then the litany and the veneration of icons and relics. Anglican usage The start of Compline in the Anglo-Catholic Anglican Service Book (1991) In the Anglican tradition, Compline was originally merged with Vespers to form Evening Prayer in the Book of Common Prayer. ECUSA's Book of Offices of 1914, the Church of England's proposed Prayer Book of 1928, and the Anglican Church of Canada's Prayer Book of 1959, and also the 2004 version of the Book of Common Prayer for the Church of Ireland[, restored a form of Compline to Anglican worship. Several contemporary liturgical texts, including the American 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the Anglican Church of Canada's Book of Alternative Services, and the Church of England's Common Worship, provide modern forms of the service. A traditional form is provided in the Anglican Service Book (1991). The Common Worship service consists of the opening sentences, the confession of sins, the psalms and other Bible lessons, the canticle of Simeon, and prayers, including a benediction. There are authorised alternatives for the days of the week and the seasons of the Christian year. As a public service of worship, like Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer, Compline may be led by a layperson.  

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Holy Gospel

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Holy Mass

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Morning Prayer

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In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Catholic Music

01:00Thursday

01:00Thursday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Luminous Mysteries

02:00Thursday

02:00Thursday

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Catholic Music

03:00Thursday

03:00Thursday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Holy Mass

04:00Thursday

04:00Thursday

Daily Prayer

05:00Thursday

05:00Thursday

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Morning Prayer

06:00Thursday

06:00Thursday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Holy Gospel

07:00Thursday

07:00Thursday

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Holy Mass

08:00Thursday

08:00Thursday

Holy Gospel

09:00Thursday

09:00Thursday

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Catholic Music

10:00Thursday

10:00Thursday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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General Audience

11:00Thursday

11:00Thursday

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The Angelus

12:20Thursday

12:20Thursday

SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Afternoon Prayer

13:00Thursday

13:00Thursday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Luminous Mysteries

13:30Thursday

13:30Thursday

[...]

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Catholic Music

14:00Thursday

14:00Thursday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Rosary Of Divine Mercy

15:00Thursday

15:00Thursday

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The Young Vatican

16:00Thursday

16:00Thursday

[...]

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The Afternoon Prayer

17:00Thursday

17:00Thursday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Meditations

17:30Thursday

17:30Thursday

[...]

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The Angelus

18:00Thursday

18:00Thursday

SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Night Prayer

19:00Thursday

19:00Thursday

For other uses, see Compline (disambiguation). Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. The English word compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap. 42). Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Lutheran, and certain other Christian denominations with liturgical traditions prescribe Compline services. Compline tends to be a contemplative Office that emphasizes spiritual peace. In many monasteries it is the custom to begin the "Great Silence" after Compline, during which the whole community, including guests, observes silence throughout the night until the morning service the next day. Historical development[edit] This section incorporates information from the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1917. References to psalms follow the numbering system of the Septuagint, as said in the Latin of the Vulgate. The origin of Compline has given rise to considerable discussion among liturgists. In the past, general opinion ascribed the origin of this Hour to St. Benedict, in the beginning of the 6th century. But Jules Pargoire and A. Vandepitte trace its source to St. Basil. Vandepitte states that it was not in Cæsarea in 375, but in his retreat in Pontus (358-362), that Basil established Compline, which Hour did not exist prior to his time, that is, until shortly after the middle of the 4th century. Dom Plaine also traced the source of Compline back to the 4th century, finding mention of it in a passage in Eusebius and in another in St. Ambrose, and also in John Cassian.These texts bear witness to the private custom of saying a prayer before retiring to rest. If this was not the canonical Hour of Compline, it was certainly a preliminary step towards it. The same writers reject the opinion of Paulin Ladeuze and Dom Besse who believe that Compline had a place in the Rule of St. Pachomius, which would mean that it originated still earlier in the 4th century. It might be possible to reconcile these different sentiments by stating that if it be an established fact that St. Basil instituted and organized the Hour of Compline for the East, as St. Benedict did for the West, there existed as early as the days of St. Cyprian and Clement of Alexandria the custom of reciting a prayer before sleep, in which practice we find the most remote origin of our Compline Compline in the Roman Rite Pre-Vatican II It is generally thought that the Benedictine form of Compline is the earliest western order, although some scholars, such as Dom Plaine, have maintained that the Hour of Compline as found in the Roman Breviary at his time, antedated the Benedictine Office. These debates apart, Benedict's arrangement probably invested the Hour of Compline with the liturgical character and arrangement which were preserved in the Benedictine Order, and largely adopted by the Roman Church. The original form of the Benedictine Office, lacking even an antiphon for the psalms, is much simpler than its Roman counterpart, resembling more closely the Minor Hours of the day Saint Benedict first gave the Office the basic structure by which it has come to be celebrated in the West: three psalms (4, 90, and 133) (Vulgate numbering) said without antiphons, the hymn, the lesson, the versicle Kyrie eleison, the benediction, and the dismissal (RB, Chaps. 17 and 18). The Roman Office of Compline came to be richer and more complex than the simple Benedictine psalmody. A fourth psalm was added, "In te Domine speravi" (Psalm 30 in Vulgate). And perhaps at a fairly late date was added the solemn introduction of a benediction with a reading (based perhaps on the spiritual reading which, in the Rule of St. Benedict, precedes Compline: RB, Chap. 42), and the confession and absolution of faults. This is absent from parallel forms, such as that of Sarum. The distinctive character and greater solemnity of the Roman form of Compline comes from the response, In manus tuas, Domine ("Into Thy hands, O Lord")..., with the evangelical canticle Nunc Dimittis and its anthem, which is particularly characteristic. The Hour of Compline, such as it appeared in the Roman Breviary prior to the Second Vatican Council, may be divided into several parts, viz. the beginning or introduction, the psalmody, with its usual accompaniment of antiphons, the hymn, the capitulum, the response, the evangelical canticle, the prayer, and the benediction. By way of liturgical variety, the service of initium noctis may also be studied in the Celtic Liturgy, such as it is read in the Antiphonary of Bangor, its plan being set forth by Warren and by Bishop (see Bibliography, below). Current usage[edit] In the breviary of 1974 Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Hours, Compline is divided as follows: introduction, an optional examination of conscience or penitential rite, a hymn, psalmody with accompanying antiphons, scriptural reading, the responsory, the Canticle of Simeon, concluding prayer, and benediction. The final antiphon to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Salve Regina, etc.) is an essential part of the Office. Summorum Pontificum does allow Compline to be recited according to the older form. Armenian Liturgy: Hours of Peace and Rest There are two offices in the Armenian daily worship which are recited between Vespers and sleep: the Peace Hour and the Rest Hour. These are two distinct services of communal worship. It is the usage in some localities to combine these two services, with abbreviations, into a single service. The Peace Hour The Peace Hour (Armenian: Խաղաղական Ժամ khaghaghakan zham) is the office associated with compline in other Christian liturgies. In the Armenian Book of Hours, or Zhamagirk`, it is stated that the Peace Hour commemorates the Spirit of God, but also the Word of God, “when he was laid in the tomb and descended into Hades, and brought peace to the spirits.” Outline of the Peace Hour If the Song of Steps is recited: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 34:1-7: I have blessed the Lord at all times (awrhnets`its` zTēr)...; Glory to the Father (Always with Now and always... Amen.; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Song of Steps: Psalm 120:1-3: In my distress I cried (I neghout`ean imoum)...; Glory to the Father.... If the Song of Steps is not said: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen; Psalm 88:1-2 God of my salvation (Astouats p`kkout`ean imoy)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father...Amen.; Peace with all. In either case the service continues here: Psalms 4, 6, 13, 16, 43, 70, 86:16-17; Glory to the Father...; Song: Vouchsafe unto us (Shnorhea mez)...; Glory to the Father....; Acclamation: At the approach of darkness (I merdzenal erekoyis)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us give thanks to the Lord (Gohats`arouk` zTearnē)...; Prayer: Beneficent Lord (Tēr Barerar)...; Psalm 27 The Lord is my light (Tēr loys im)...; Glory to the Father...; Song: Look down with love (Nayats` sirov)...; Acclamation: Lord, do not turn your face (Tēr mi dartzouts`aner)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakal)...; Prayer: Bestowing with grace (Shnorhatou bareats`).... On non-fasting days the service ends here with: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen. On fasting days continue here: Psalm 119; Glory to the Father...; Hymn: We entreat you (I k`ez hayts`emk`).... During the Great Fast: Evening Chant (varies); Acclamation: To the spirits at rest (Hogvovn hangouts`elots`)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… For the repose of the souls (Vasn hangouts`eal)...; Lord, have mercy (thrice); Prayer: Christ, Son of God (K`ristos Ordi Astoutsoy)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen.” The Rest Hour[edit] The Rest Hour (Armenian: Հանգստեան Ժամ hangstean zham) is celebrated after the Peace Hour, and is the last of the offices of the day. It may be considered communal worship before sleep. It bears some resemblance in content to Compline in the Roman Rite. In the Armenian Book of Hours it is stated in many manuscripts that the Rest Hour commemorates God the Father, “that he protect us through the protecting arm of the Onlybegotten in the darkness of night.” Outline of the Rest Hour: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 43:3-5: Lord, send your light and your truth (Arak`ea Tēr)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Psalms 119:41-56, 119:113-120, 119:169-176, 91, 123, 54, Daniel 3:29-34, Luke 2:29-32, Psalms 142:7, 86:16-17, 138:7-8, Luke 1:46-55; Glory to the Father...; Acclamation: My soul into your hands (Andzn im I tzers k`o)...; Proclamation: And again in peace…Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakaln)...; Prayer: Lord our God (Tēr Astouats mer).... Ending: Psalm 4; Pre-gospel sequence; Gospel: John 12:24ff; Glory to you, our God; Proclamation: By the holy Cross (Sourb khach`ivs…)...; Prayer: Protect us (Pahpannea zmez)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Ending during Fasts: Acclamation: We fall down before you (Ankanimk` araji k`o)...; Meditation Twelve of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 94 of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 41 of St. Gregory of Narek; Prayer: In faith I confess (Havatov khostovanim)... by St. Nerses the Graceful; Acclamation: Through your holy spotless and virgin mother (Vasn srbouhvoy)...; Proclamation: Holy Birthgiver of God (Sourb zAstouatsatsinn), ,; Prayer: Accept, Lord (Unkal, Tēr)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Compline in Byzantine usage[edit] Compline in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches (Greek (τὸ) Ἀπόδειπνον [apóðipnon], Slavonic Povecheriye: literally the "after-supper" [prayer]) takes two distinct forms: Small Compline and Great Compline. The two versions are quite different in length. At Compline (whether Small or Great) a Canon to the Theotokos in the Tone of the Week will normally be read (these Canons will be found in the Octoechos). Services to saints in the Menaion that for various reasons cannot be celebrated on the day assigned to them, may be chanted on the nearest convenient day at Compline. In such cases, the Canon for the Saint would be read together with the Canon to the Theotokos, followed by the Stichera to the saint from Vespers. There are also particular days (such as certain Forefeasts, Afterfeasts, and days during the Pentecostarion) that have special Canons for Compline composed for them. The Office always ends with a mutual asking of forgiveness. In some traditions, most notably among the Russians, Evening Prayers (i.e., Prayers Before Sleep) will be read near the end of Compline. It is an ancient custom, practiced on the Holy Mountain and in other monasteries, for everyone present at the end of Compline to venerate the relics and icons in the church, and receive the priest's blessing. Small Compline Small Compline is served on most nights of the year (i.e., those nights on which Great Compline is not served). On the eves of Sundays and feasts with All-Night Vigil, Compline may be either read privately or suppressed altogether. Among the Greeks, who do not normally hold an All-Night Vigil on Saturday evenings, Compline is said as normal. The service is composed of three Psalms (50, 69, 142), the Small Doxology, the Nicene Creed, the Canon followed by Axion Estin,[4] the Trisagion, Troparia for the day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness and final blessing by the priest. After this, there is a Litany and the veneration of Icons and relics. Great Compline Great Compline is a penitential office which is served on the following occasions: Tuesday and Thursday nights of Cheesefare Week (the week before Great Lent) Monday through Thursday nights of Great Lent Friday nights of Great Lent Monday and Tuesday of Holy Week Monday through Friday during the lesser Lenten seasons: Nativity Fast, Apostles' Fast, and Dormition Fast The Eves of certain Great Feasts, as a part of the All-Night Vigil: Nativity, Theophany, and Annunciation. Unlike Small Compline, Great Compline has portions of the service which are chanted by the Choir and during Lent the Prayer of St. Ephraim is said with prostrations. During the First Week of Great Lent, the Great Canon of Saint Andrew of Crete is divided into four portions and read on Monday through Thursday nights. Due to the penitential nature of Great Compline, it is not uncommon for the priest to hear Confession during the service. Great Compline is composed of three sections, each beginning with the call to prayer, "O come, let us worship...": First Part Psalms[10] 4, 6, and 12; Glory..., etc.; Psalms 24, 30, 90; then the hymn "God is With Us" and troparia, the Creed, the hymn "O Most holy Lady Theotokos", the Trisagion and Troparia of the Day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Basil the Great. Second Part Psalms 50, 101, and the Prayer of Manasses; the Trisagion, and Troparia of Repentance, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Mardarius. Third Part Psalms 69, 142, and the Small Doxology; then the Canon followed by Axion Estin, the Trisagion, the hymn "O Lord of Hosts, be with us...", Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, "More honorable than the cherubim....", the Prayer of St. Ephraim, Trisagion, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness. Instead of the normal final blessing by the priest, all prostrate themselves while the priest reads a special intercessory prayer. Then the litany and the veneration of icons and relics. Anglican usage The start of Compline in the Anglo-Catholic Anglican Service Book (1991) In the Anglican tradition, Compline was originally merged with Vespers to form Evening Prayer in the Book of Common Prayer. ECUSA's Book of Offices of 1914, the Church of England's proposed Prayer Book of 1928, and the Anglican Church of Canada's Prayer Book of 1959, and also the 2004 version of the Book of Common Prayer for the Church of Ireland[, restored a form of Compline to Anglican worship. Several contemporary liturgical texts, including the American 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the Anglican Church of Canada's Book of Alternative Services, and the Church of England's Common Worship, provide modern forms of the service. A traditional form is provided in the Anglican Service Book (1991). The Common Worship service consists of the opening sentences, the confession of sins, the psalms and other Bible lessons, the canticle of Simeon, and prayers, including a benediction. There are authorised alternatives for the days of the week and the seasons of the Christian year. As a public service of worship, like Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer, Compline may be led by a layperson.  

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Holy Gospel

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Holy Mass

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Vatican News 6:30 PM

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Catholic Music

23:00Thursday

23:00Thursday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Morning Prayer

00:00Friday

00:00Friday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Catholic Music

01:00Friday

01:00Friday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Sorrowful Mysteries

02:00Friday

02:00Friday

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Catholic Music

03:00Friday

03:00Friday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Holy Mass

04:00Friday

04:00Friday

Daily Prayer

05:00Friday

05:00Friday

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Morning Prayer

06:00Friday

06:00Friday

In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Holy Gospel

07:00Friday

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Holy Mass

08:00Friday

08:00Friday

Holy Gospel

09:00Friday

09:00Friday

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Catholic Music

10:00Friday

10:00Friday

 
Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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General Audience

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The Angelus

12:25Friday

12:25Friday

SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Afternoon Prayer

13:00Friday

13:00Friday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Sorrowful Mysteries

13:30Friday

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Sorrowful Mysteries

14:00Friday

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The Young Vatican

16:00Friday

16:00Friday

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The Afternoon Prayer

17:00Friday

17:00Friday

Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Meditations

17:30Friday

17:30Friday

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The Angelus

18:00Friday

18:00Friday

SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Night Prayer

19:00Friday

19:00Friday

For other uses, see Compline (disambiguation). Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. The English word compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap. 42). Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Lutheran, and certain other Christian denominations with liturgical traditions prescribe Compline services. Compline tends to be a contemplative Office that emphasizes spiritual peace. In many monasteries it is the custom to begin the "Great Silence" after Compline, during which the whole community, including guests, observes silence throughout the night until the morning service the next day. Historical development[edit] This section incorporates information from the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1917. References to psalms follow the numbering system of the Septuagint, as said in the Latin of the Vulgate. The origin of Compline has given rise to considerable discussion among liturgists. In the past, general opinion ascribed the origin of this Hour to St. Benedict, in the beginning of the 6th century. But Jules Pargoire and A. Vandepitte trace its source to St. Basil. Vandepitte states that it was not in Cæsarea in 375, but in his retreat in Pontus (358-362), that Basil established Compline, which Hour did not exist prior to his time, that is, until shortly after the middle of the 4th century. Dom Plaine also traced the source of Compline back to the 4th century, finding mention of it in a passage in Eusebius and in another in St. Ambrose, and also in John Cassian.These texts bear witness to the private custom of saying a prayer before retiring to rest. If this was not the canonical Hour of Compline, it was certainly a preliminary step towards it. The same writers reject the opinion of Paulin Ladeuze and Dom Besse who believe that Compline had a place in the Rule of St. Pachomius, which would mean that it originated still earlier in the 4th century. It might be possible to reconcile these different sentiments by stating that if it be an established fact that St. Basil instituted and organized the Hour of Compline for the East, as St. Benedict did for the West, there existed as early as the days of St. Cyprian and Clement of Alexandria the custom of reciting a prayer before sleep, in which practice we find the most remote origin of our Compline Compline in the Roman Rite Pre-Vatican II It is generally thought that the Benedictine form of Compline is the earliest western order, although some scholars, such as Dom Plaine, have maintained that the Hour of Compline as found in the Roman Breviary at his time, antedated the Benedictine Office. These debates apart, Benedict's arrangement probably invested the Hour of Compline with the liturgical character and arrangement which were preserved in the Benedictine Order, and largely adopted by the Roman Church. The original form of the Benedictine Office, lacking even an antiphon for the psalms, is much simpler than its Roman counterpart, resembling more closely the Minor Hours of the day Saint Benedict first gave the Office the basic structure by which it has come to be celebrated in the West: three psalms (4, 90, and 133) (Vulgate numbering) said without antiphons, the hymn, the lesson, the versicle Kyrie eleison, the benediction, and the dismissal (RB, Chaps. 17 and 18). The Roman Office of Compline came to be richer and more complex than the simple Benedictine psalmody. A fourth psalm was added, "In te Domine speravi" (Psalm 30 in Vulgate). And perhaps at a fairly late date was added the solemn introduction of a benediction with a reading (based perhaps on the spiritual reading which, in the Rule of St. Benedict, precedes Compline: RB, Chap. 42), and the confession and absolution of faults. This is absent from parallel forms, such as that of Sarum. The distinctive character and greater solemnity of the Roman form of Compline comes from the response, In manus tuas, Domine ("Into Thy hands, O Lord")..., with the evangelical canticle Nunc Dimittis and its anthem, which is particularly characteristic. The Hour of Compline, such as it appeared in the Roman Breviary prior to the Second Vatican Council, may be divided into several parts, viz. the beginning or introduction, the psalmody, with its usual accompaniment of antiphons, the hymn, the capitulum, the response, the evangelical canticle, the prayer, and the benediction. By way of liturgical variety, the service of initium noctis may also be studied in the Celtic Liturgy, such as it is read in the Antiphonary of Bangor, its plan being set forth by Warren and by Bishop (see Bibliography, below). Current usage[edit] In the breviary of 1974 Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Hours, Compline is divided as follows: introduction, an optional examination of conscience or penitential rite, a hymn, psalmody with accompanying antiphons, scriptural reading, the responsory, the Canticle of Simeon, concluding prayer, and benediction. The final antiphon to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Salve Regina, etc.) is an essential part of the Office. Summorum Pontificum does allow Compline to be recited according to the older form. Armenian Liturgy: Hours of Peace and Rest There are two offices in the Armenian daily worship which are recited between Vespers and sleep: the Peace Hour and the Rest Hour. These are two distinct services of communal worship. It is the usage in some localities to combine these two services, with abbreviations, into a single service. The Peace Hour The Peace Hour (Armenian: Խաղաղական Ժամ khaghaghakan zham) is the office associated with compline in other Christian liturgies. In the Armenian Book of Hours, or Zhamagirk`, it is stated that the Peace Hour commemorates the Spirit of God, but also the Word of God, “when he was laid in the tomb and descended into Hades, and brought peace to the spirits.” Outline of the Peace Hour If the Song of Steps is recited: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 34:1-7: I have blessed the Lord at all times (awrhnets`its` zTēr)...; Glory to the Father (Always with Now and always... Amen.; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Song of Steps: Psalm 120:1-3: In my distress I cried (I neghout`ean imoum)...; Glory to the Father.... If the Song of Steps is not said: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen; Psalm 88:1-2 God of my salvation (Astouats p`kkout`ean imoy)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father...Amen.; Peace with all. In either case the service continues here: Psalms 4, 6, 13, 16, 43, 70, 86:16-17; Glory to the Father...; Song: Vouchsafe unto us (Shnorhea mez)...; Glory to the Father....; Acclamation: At the approach of darkness (I merdzenal erekoyis)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us give thanks to the Lord (Gohats`arouk` zTearnē)...; Prayer: Beneficent Lord (Tēr Barerar)...; Psalm 27 The Lord is my light (Tēr loys im)...; Glory to the Father...; Song: Look down with love (Nayats` sirov)...; Acclamation: Lord, do not turn your face (Tēr mi dartzouts`aner)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakal)...; Prayer: Bestowing with grace (Shnorhatou bareats`).... On non-fasting days the service ends here with: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen. On fasting days continue here: Psalm 119; Glory to the Father...; Hymn: We entreat you (I k`ez hayts`emk`).... During the Great Fast: Evening Chant (varies); Acclamation: To the spirits at rest (Hogvovn hangouts`elots`)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… For the repose of the souls (Vasn hangouts`eal)...; Lord, have mercy (thrice); Prayer: Christ, Son of God (K`ristos Ordi Astoutsoy)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen.” The Rest Hour[edit] The Rest Hour (Armenian: Հանգստեան Ժամ hangstean zham) is celebrated after the Peace Hour, and is the last of the offices of the day. It may be considered communal worship before sleep. It bears some resemblance in content to Compline in the Roman Rite. In the Armenian Book of Hours it is stated in many manuscripts that the Rest Hour commemorates God the Father, “that he protect us through the protecting arm of the Onlybegotten in the darkness of night.” Outline of the Rest Hour: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 43:3-5: Lord, send your light and your truth (Arak`ea Tēr)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Psalms 119:41-56, 119:113-120, 119:169-176, 91, 123, 54, Daniel 3:29-34, Luke 2:29-32, Psalms 142:7, 86:16-17, 138:7-8, Luke 1:46-55; Glory to the Father...; Acclamation: My soul into your hands (Andzn im I tzers k`o)...; Proclamation: And again in peace…Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakaln)...; Prayer: Lord our God (Tēr Astouats mer).... Ending: Psalm 4; Pre-gospel sequence; Gospel: John 12:24ff; Glory to you, our God; Proclamation: By the holy Cross (Sourb khach`ivs…)...; Prayer: Protect us (Pahpannea zmez)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Ending during Fasts: Acclamation: We fall down before you (Ankanimk` araji k`o)...; Meditation Twelve of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 94 of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 41 of St. Gregory of Narek; Prayer: In faith I confess (Havatov khostovanim)... by St. Nerses the Graceful; Acclamation: Through your holy spotless and virgin mother (Vasn srbouhvoy)...; Proclamation: Holy Birthgiver of God (Sourb zAstouatsatsinn), ,; Prayer: Accept, Lord (Unkal, Tēr)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Compline in Byzantine usage[edit] Compline in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches (Greek (τὸ) Ἀπόδειπνον [apóðipnon], Slavonic Povecheriye: literally the "after-supper" [prayer]) takes two distinct forms: Small Compline and Great Compline. The two versions are quite different in length. At Compline (whether Small or Great) a Canon to the Theotokos in the Tone of the Week will normally be read (these Canons will be found in the Octoechos). Services to saints in the Menaion that for various reasons cannot be celebrated on the day assigned to them, may be chanted on the nearest convenient day at Compline. In such cases, the Canon for the Saint would be read together with the Canon to the Theotokos, followed by the Stichera to the saint from Vespers. There are also particular days (such as certain Forefeasts, Afterfeasts, and days during the Pentecostarion) that have special Canons for Compline composed for them. The Office always ends with a mutual asking of forgiveness. In some traditions, most notably among the Russians, Evening Prayers (i.e., Prayers Before Sleep) will be read near the end of Compline. It is an ancient custom, practiced on the Holy Mountain and in other monasteries, for everyone present at the end of Compline to venerate the relics and icons in the church, and receive the priest's blessing. Small Compline Small Compline is served on most nights of the year (i.e., those nights on which Great Compline is not served). On the eves of Sundays and feasts with All-Night Vigil, Compline may be either read privately or suppressed altogether. Among the Greeks, who do not normally hold an All-Night Vigil on Saturday evenings, Compline is said as normal. The service is composed of three Psalms (50, 69, 142), the Small Doxology, the Nicene Creed, the Canon followed by Axion Estin,[4] the Trisagion, Troparia for the day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness and final blessing by the priest. After this, there is a Litany and the veneration of Icons and relics. Great Compline Great Compline is a penitential office which is served on the following occasions: Tuesday and Thursday nights of Cheesefare Week (the week before Great Lent) Monday through Thursday nights of Great Lent Friday nights of Great Lent Monday and Tuesday of Holy Week Monday through Friday during the lesser Lenten seasons: Nativity Fast, Apostles' Fast, and Dormition Fast The Eves of certain Great Feasts, as a part of the All-Night Vigil: Nativity, Theophany, and Annunciation. Unlike Small Compline, Great Compline has portions of the service which are chanted by the Choir and during Lent the Prayer of St. Ephraim is said with prostrations. During the First Week of Great Lent, the Great Canon of Saint Andrew of Crete is divided into four portions and read on Monday through Thursday nights. Due to the penitential nature of Great Compline, it is not uncommon for the priest to hear Confession during the service. Great Compline is composed of three sections, each beginning with the call to prayer, "O come, let us worship...": First Part Psalms[10] 4, 6, and 12; Glory..., etc.; Psalms 24, 30, 90; then the hymn "God is With Us" and troparia, the Creed, the hymn "O Most holy Lady Theotokos", the Trisagion and Troparia of the Day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Basil the Great. Second Part Psalms 50, 101, and the Prayer of Manasses; the Trisagion, and Troparia of Repentance, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Mardarius. Third Part Psalms 69, 142, and the Small Doxology; then the Canon followed by Axion Estin, the Trisagion, the hymn "O Lord of Hosts, be with us...", Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, "More honorable than the cherubim....", the Prayer of St. Ephraim, Trisagion, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness. Instead of the normal final blessing by the priest, all prostrate themselves while the priest reads a special intercessory prayer. Then the litany and the veneration of icons and relics. Anglican usage The start of Compline in the Anglo-Catholic Anglican Service Book (1991) In the Anglican tradition, Compline was originally merged with Vespers to form Evening Prayer in the Book of Common Prayer. ECUSA's Book of Offices of 1914, the Church of England's proposed Prayer Book of 1928, and the Anglican Church of Canada's Prayer Book of 1959, and also the 2004 version of the Book of Common Prayer for the Church of Ireland[, restored a form of Compline to Anglican worship. Several contemporary liturgical texts, including the American 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the Anglican Church of Canada's Book of Alternative Services, and the Church of England's Common Worship, provide modern forms of the service. A traditional form is provided in the Anglican Service Book (1991). The Common Worship service consists of the opening sentences, the confession of sins, the psalms and other Bible lessons, the canticle of Simeon, and prayers, including a benediction. There are authorised alternatives for the days of the week and the seasons of the Christian year. As a public service of worship, like Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer, Compline may be led by a layperson.  

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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Morning Prayer

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In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Gregorian Chants

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Joyful Mysteries

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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Holy Mass

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Daily Prayer

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Morning Prayer

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In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer's Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552. It draws on the monastic offices of Matins, Lauds and Prime, beginning with opening versicles and responses, continuing with the invitatory "Venite" (Psalm 95), the "Te Deum" and "Benedictus", interspersed with Bible readings, as well as recitation of the Apostles' Creed, and ending with closing versicles adapted from the Breviary. The Prayer Book lectionary provides for a virtually complete reading of the Bible in the course of a year. The usual practice in medieval parish worship was for the congregation to attend the office of Matins, followed by the Latin Mass according to the Roman Rite, followed by the Litany of the Saints, sung in procession. Following the Reformation, the usual Sunday Service followed a similar pattern, but with the English Litany said between Morning Prayer and Holy Communion. On Sundays when there was no celebration of Communion (i.e. most of them), only the ante-Communion would be said. Even so, — and taking into account the legal requirement to read one from the specified set of printed Homilies — the post-Reformation service lasted more than twice as long as its pre-Reformation equivalent.[citation needed] Historically, Morning Prayer was the main Sunday morning service on most Sundays in all Anglican parishes, with Holy Communion being celebrated after Morning or Evening Prayer (typically once a month, on the first Sunday). In the twentieth century, Holy Communion became the main Sunday morning service once or twice per month. With the revival of the Eucharist as the principal Sunday service during the second half of the twentieth century, Morning Prayer has been the principal Sunday service less frequently.

Origins of liturgical shape

The Breviary in its original monastic context contemplated recitation by two alternating groups of monks or nuns. This evolved into a recitation between parson and clerk on behalf of the congregation; in the 19th century the role of the clerk was increasingly given over to the whole congregation and choirs and congregations began singing the psalms and canticles to a musical setting known as Anglican chant. With the development of the Oxford Movement and increasing liturgicalism among high church-inclined clergy and parishes, Anglican chant was replaced by plainchant in some Anglo-Catholic constituencies, where Morning Prayer on Sundays became a devotional exercise prior to the celebration of the eucharist. The daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer, canonically required of Anglican clergy, has sustained the spiritual life of Anglican communities. Nicholas Ferrar's 17th-century religious community at Little Gidding, commemorated in T. S. Eliot's eponymous poem, required daily recitation of Morning and Evening Prayer. In the 18th century, the daily office of Morning and Evening Prayer as set out in the Book of Common Prayer was the essence of John and Charles Wesley's "method", which also included scriptural study, fasting and regular reception of Holy Communion. The same "method" also informed the 19th-century revival of monastic life within the Anglican church  

References

  1. ^ "The Shorter Prayer Book". justus.anglican.org. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
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Holy Gospel

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Holy Gospel

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General Audience

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The Angelus

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SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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The Afternoon Prayer

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Saint Paul tells us that we should "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17) yet in the modern world, it sometimes seems that prayer takes a back seat not only to our work but to entertainment. As a result, many of us have fallen out of the habit of daily prayer that characterized the lives of Christians in centuries past. Yet an active prayer life is essential to our growth in grace and our advancement in the Christian life. Learn more about prayer and about how to integrate prayer into every aspect of your daily life

What Is Prayer?

Prayer is one of the most basic activities of all Christians, not just Catholics, and yet it is also one of the least understood. While Christians should pray daily, many find that they do not know how to pray or what to pray for. Too often we confuse prayer and worship, and think that our prayers must use the language and structures that we associate with the Mass or other liturgical services. Yet prayer, at its most basic, is engaging in conversation with God and with His saints.  Once we understand that prayer is not always worship, nor is it simply asking God for something, prayer can become as natural as talking to our family and friends.

The Types of Prayer

Fr. Brian A.T. Bovee elevates the Host during a Traditional Latin Mass at Saint Mary's Oratory, Rockford, Illinois, May 9, 2010. (Photo © Scott P. Richert)
Of course, there are times when we need to ask God for something. We're all familiar with these types of prayer, which are known as prayers of petition. But there are several other types of prayer as well, and if we have a healthy prayer life, we will make use of each of the types of prayer every day. Learn about the types of prayer and find examples of each type.
 

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Joyful Mysteries

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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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Rosary Of Divine Mercy

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The Night Prayer

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For other uses, see Compline (disambiguation). Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. The English word compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap. 42). Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Lutheran, and certain other Christian denominations with liturgical traditions prescribe Compline services. Compline tends to be a contemplative Office that emphasizes spiritual peace. In many monasteries it is the custom to begin the "Great Silence" after Compline, during which the whole community, including guests, observes silence throughout the night until the morning service the next day. Historical development[edit] This section incorporates information from the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1917. References to psalms follow the numbering system of the Septuagint, as said in the Latin of the Vulgate. The origin of Compline has given rise to considerable discussion among liturgists. In the past, general opinion ascribed the origin of this Hour to St. Benedict, in the beginning of the 6th century. But Jules Pargoire and A. Vandepitte trace its source to St. Basil. Vandepitte states that it was not in Cæsarea in 375, but in his retreat in Pontus (358-362), that Basil established Compline, which Hour did not exist prior to his time, that is, until shortly after the middle of the 4th century. Dom Plaine also traced the source of Compline back to the 4th century, finding mention of it in a passage in Eusebius and in another in St. Ambrose, and also in John Cassian.These texts bear witness to the private custom of saying a prayer before retiring to rest. If this was not the canonical Hour of Compline, it was certainly a preliminary step towards it. The same writers reject the opinion of Paulin Ladeuze and Dom Besse who believe that Compline had a place in the Rule of St. Pachomius, which would mean that it originated still earlier in the 4th century. It might be possible to reconcile these different sentiments by stating that if it be an established fact that St. Basil instituted and organized the Hour of Compline for the East, as St. Benedict did for the West, there existed as early as the days of St. Cyprian and Clement of Alexandria the custom of reciting a prayer before sleep, in which practice we find the most remote origin of our Compline Compline in the Roman Rite Pre-Vatican II It is generally thought that the Benedictine form of Compline is the earliest western order, although some scholars, such as Dom Plaine, have maintained that the Hour of Compline as found in the Roman Breviary at his time, antedated the Benedictine Office. These debates apart, Benedict's arrangement probably invested the Hour of Compline with the liturgical character and arrangement which were preserved in the Benedictine Order, and largely adopted by the Roman Church. The original form of the Benedictine Office, lacking even an antiphon for the psalms, is much simpler than its Roman counterpart, resembling more closely the Minor Hours of the day Saint Benedict first gave the Office the basic structure by which it has come to be celebrated in the West: three psalms (4, 90, and 133) (Vulgate numbering) said without antiphons, the hymn, the lesson, the versicle Kyrie eleison, the benediction, and the dismissal (RB, Chaps. 17 and 18). The Roman Office of Compline came to be richer and more complex than the simple Benedictine psalmody. A fourth psalm was added, "In te Domine speravi" (Psalm 30 in Vulgate). And perhaps at a fairly late date was added the solemn introduction of a benediction with a reading (based perhaps on the spiritual reading which, in the Rule of St. Benedict, precedes Compline: RB, Chap. 42), and the confession and absolution of faults. This is absent from parallel forms, such as that of Sarum. The distinctive character and greater solemnity of the Roman form of Compline comes from the response, In manus tuas, Domine ("Into Thy hands, O Lord")..., with the evangelical canticle Nunc Dimittis and its anthem, which is particularly characteristic. The Hour of Compline, such as it appeared in the Roman Breviary prior to the Second Vatican Council, may be divided into several parts, viz. the beginning or introduction, the psalmody, with its usual accompaniment of antiphons, the hymn, the capitulum, the response, the evangelical canticle, the prayer, and the benediction. By way of liturgical variety, the service of initium noctis may also be studied in the Celtic Liturgy, such as it is read in the Antiphonary of Bangor, its plan being set forth by Warren and by Bishop (see Bibliography, below). Current usage[edit] In the breviary of 1974 Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Hours, Compline is divided as follows: introduction, an optional examination of conscience or penitential rite, a hymn, psalmody with accompanying antiphons, scriptural reading, the responsory, the Canticle of Simeon, concluding prayer, and benediction. The final antiphon to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Salve Regina, etc.) is an essential part of the Office. Summorum Pontificum does allow Compline to be recited according to the older form. Armenian Liturgy: Hours of Peace and Rest There are two offices in the Armenian daily worship which are recited between Vespers and sleep: the Peace Hour and the Rest Hour. These are two distinct services of communal worship. It is the usage in some localities to combine these two services, with abbreviations, into a single service. The Peace Hour The Peace Hour (Armenian: Խաղաղական Ժամ khaghaghakan zham) is the office associated with compline in other Christian liturgies. In the Armenian Book of Hours, or Zhamagirk`, it is stated that the Peace Hour commemorates the Spirit of God, but also the Word of God, “when he was laid in the tomb and descended into Hades, and brought peace to the spirits.” Outline of the Peace Hour If the Song of Steps is recited: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 34:1-7: I have blessed the Lord at all times (awrhnets`its` zTēr)...; Glory to the Father (Always with Now and always... Amen.; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Song of Steps: Psalm 120:1-3: In my distress I cried (I neghout`ean imoum)...; Glory to the Father.... If the Song of Steps is not said: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen; Psalm 88:1-2 God of my salvation (Astouats p`kkout`ean imoy)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father...Amen.; Peace with all. In either case the service continues here: Psalms 4, 6, 13, 16, 43, 70, 86:16-17; Glory to the Father...; Song: Vouchsafe unto us (Shnorhea mez)...; Glory to the Father....; Acclamation: At the approach of darkness (I merdzenal erekoyis)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us give thanks to the Lord (Gohats`arouk` zTearnē)...; Prayer: Beneficent Lord (Tēr Barerar)...; Psalm 27 The Lord is my light (Tēr loys im)...; Glory to the Father...; Song: Look down with love (Nayats` sirov)...; Acclamation: Lord, do not turn your face (Tēr mi dartzouts`aner)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakal)...; Prayer: Bestowing with grace (Shnorhatou bareats`).... On non-fasting days the service ends here with: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen. On fasting days continue here: Psalm 119; Glory to the Father...; Hymn: We entreat you (I k`ez hayts`emk`).... During the Great Fast: Evening Chant (varies); Acclamation: To the spirits at rest (Hogvovn hangouts`elots`)...; Proclamation: And again in peace… For the repose of the souls (Vasn hangouts`eal)...; Lord, have mercy (thrice); Prayer: Christ, Son of God (K`ristos Ordi Astoutsoy)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our father... Amen.” The Rest Hour[edit] The Rest Hour (Armenian: Հանգստեան Ժամ hangstean zham) is celebrated after the Peace Hour, and is the last of the offices of the day. It may be considered communal worship before sleep. It bears some resemblance in content to Compline in the Roman Rite. In the Armenian Book of Hours it is stated in many manuscripts that the Rest Hour commemorates God the Father, “that he protect us through the protecting arm of the Onlybegotten in the darkness of night.” Outline of the Rest Hour: Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father... Amen.; Psalm 43:3-5: Lord, send your light and your truth (Arak`ea Tēr)...; Glory to the Father...; And again in peace let us pray to the Lord...; Blessing and glory to the Father... Amen.; Psalms 119:41-56, 119:113-120, 119:169-176, 91, 123, 54, Daniel 3:29-34, Luke 2:29-32, Psalms 142:7, 86:16-17, 138:7-8, Luke 1:46-55; Glory to the Father...; Acclamation: My soul into your hands (Andzn im I tzers k`o)...; Proclamation: And again in peace…Let us beseech almighty God (Aghach`ests`ouk` zamenakaln)...; Prayer: Lord our God (Tēr Astouats mer).... Ending: Psalm 4; Pre-gospel sequence; Gospel: John 12:24ff; Glory to you, our God; Proclamation: By the holy Cross (Sourb khach`ivs…)...; Prayer: Protect us (Pahpannea zmez)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Ending during Fasts: Acclamation: We fall down before you (Ankanimk` araji k`o)...; Meditation Twelve of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 94 of St. Gregory of Narek; Meditation 41 of St. Gregory of Narek; Prayer: In faith I confess (Havatov khostovanim)... by St. Nerses the Graceful; Acclamation: Through your holy spotless and virgin mother (Vasn srbouhvoy)...; Proclamation: Holy Birthgiver of God (Sourb zAstouatsatsinn), ,; Prayer: Accept, Lord (Unkal, Tēr)...; Blessed is our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. Our Father...Amen. Compline in Byzantine usage[edit] Compline in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches (Greek (τὸ) Ἀπόδειπνον [apóðipnon], Slavonic Povecheriye: literally the "after-supper" [prayer]) takes two distinct forms: Small Compline and Great Compline. The two versions are quite different in length. At Compline (whether Small or Great) a Canon to the Theotokos in the Tone of the Week will normally be read (these Canons will be found in the Octoechos). Services to saints in the Menaion that for various reasons cannot be celebrated on the day assigned to them, may be chanted on the nearest convenient day at Compline. In such cases, the Canon for the Saint would be read together with the Canon to the Theotokos, followed by the Stichera to the saint from Vespers. There are also particular days (such as certain Forefeasts, Afterfeasts, and days during the Pentecostarion) that have special Canons for Compline composed for them. The Office always ends with a mutual asking of forgiveness. In some traditions, most notably among the Russians, Evening Prayers (i.e., Prayers Before Sleep) will be read near the end of Compline. It is an ancient custom, practiced on the Holy Mountain and in other monasteries, for everyone present at the end of Compline to venerate the relics and icons in the church, and receive the priest's blessing. Small Compline Small Compline is served on most nights of the year (i.e., those nights on which Great Compline is not served). On the eves of Sundays and feasts with All-Night Vigil, Compline may be either read privately or suppressed altogether. Among the Greeks, who do not normally hold an All-Night Vigil on Saturday evenings, Compline is said as normal. The service is composed of three Psalms (50, 69, 142), the Small Doxology, the Nicene Creed, the Canon followed by Axion Estin,[4] the Trisagion, Troparia for the day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness and final blessing by the priest. After this, there is a Litany and the veneration of Icons and relics. Great Compline Great Compline is a penitential office which is served on the following occasions: Tuesday and Thursday nights of Cheesefare Week (the week before Great Lent) Monday through Thursday nights of Great Lent Friday nights of Great Lent Monday and Tuesday of Holy Week Monday through Friday during the lesser Lenten seasons: Nativity Fast, Apostles' Fast, and Dormition Fast The Eves of certain Great Feasts, as a part of the All-Night Vigil: Nativity, Theophany, and Annunciation. Unlike Small Compline, Great Compline has portions of the service which are chanted by the Choir and during Lent the Prayer of St. Ephraim is said with prostrations. During the First Week of Great Lent, the Great Canon of Saint Andrew of Crete is divided into four portions and read on Monday through Thursday nights. Due to the penitential nature of Great Compline, it is not uncommon for the priest to hear Confession during the service. Great Compline is composed of three sections, each beginning with the call to prayer, "O come, let us worship...": First Part Psalms[10] 4, 6, and 12; Glory..., etc.; Psalms 24, 30, 90; then the hymn "God is With Us" and troparia, the Creed, the hymn "O Most holy Lady Theotokos", the Trisagion and Troparia of the Day, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Basil the Great. Second Part Psalms 50, 101, and the Prayer of Manasses; the Trisagion, and Troparia of Repentance, Kyrie eleison (40 times), "More honorable than the cherubim..." and the Prayer of St. Mardarius. Third Part Psalms 69, 142, and the Small Doxology; then the Canon followed by Axion Estin, the Trisagion, the hymn "O Lord of Hosts, be with us...", Kyrie eleison (40 times), the Prayer of the Hours, "More honorable than the cherubim....", the Prayer of St. Ephraim, Trisagion, the Supplicatory Prayer of Paul the Monk, and the Prayer to Jesus Christ of Antiochus the Monk. Then the mutual forgiveness. Instead of the normal final blessing by the priest, all prostrate themselves while the priest reads a special intercessory prayer. Then the litany and the veneration of icons and relics. Anglican usage The start of Compline in the Anglo-Catholic Anglican Service Book (1991) In the Anglican tradition, Compline was originally merged with Vespers to form Evening Prayer in the Book of Common Prayer. ECUSA's Book of Offices of 1914, the Church of England's proposed Prayer Book of 1928, and the Anglican Church of Canada's Prayer Book of 1959, and also the 2004 version of the Book of Common Prayer for the Church of Ireland[, restored a form of Compline to Anglican worship. Several contemporary liturgical texts, including the American 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the Anglican Church of Canada's Book of Alternative Services, and the Church of England's Common Worship, provide modern forms of the service. A traditional form is provided in the Anglican Service Book (1991). The Common Worship service consists of the opening sentences, the confession of sins, the psalms and other Bible lessons, the canticle of Simeon, and prayers, including a benediction. There are authorised alternatives for the days of the week and the seasons of the Christian year. As a public service of worship, like Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer, Compline may be led by a layperson.  

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Meditations

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The Angelus

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SHORT HISTORY OF THE ANGELUS
Giuseppe Luppino
 We repeat the words of the Annunciation for the world, the Church On 25 March, the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Annunciation: an important moment for her to pause to recall what suddenly happened in the history of mankind, so that man could be changed profoundly and saved. Our experience of education in the faith has us continue our formation by reciting the Angelus eventhough we know that the Angelus in the form we have it was crystallized only around the first half of the 16th century. Medieval custom of triple Hail Mary in the evening In the centuries before that, this name or the name Ave Maria was applied to the moment of prayer specifically devoted to the daily recitation of the "angelic greeting", the Hail Mary (a custom that seems to have spread in England before it took hold on the continent of Europe). The practice of reciting the Hail Mary three times in a row dates at least to the 12th century, and St Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) strongly recommended it. This devout practice was a great favourite also of St Mechtilde of Helfta (1241-1298) in her Revelations, and St Bonaventure, in a Chapter of the Order of the Friars Minor in 1269 proposed they recite these three Hail Mary's in the evening after Compline, meditating on the mystery of Christ's Incarnation, urging at the same time that the recitation be preceded always by the ringing of a bell so that the brothers and all the faithful nearby would know that it was time for the Hail Mary. Morning and Noon Angelus for Christianity at risk As time passed, in the Christian lands, the practice was repeated first in the early morning, and then at midday. Testimonies to the noon recitation are found around 1413 in the land now known as Czechoslovakia and in 1423 in Cologne. Pope Sixtus IV, in 1475, was the first to endow the recitation of the Angelus at noon with an indulgence. This indulgence was confirmed and extended by Pope Leo X in 1517 to whoever recited it in the morning, at noon, and in the evening, and Pope Pius XI (1922-1939) seems to have been the last one to grant an indulgence. This is a moment of prayer, then, that has been used to sanctify the first part of the day for centuries and that even was prayed to rescue Christianity in difficult moments, such as happened in Belgrade in 1456, when the Turks succeeded in invading Serbia. Modern form of devotion to Mary and the Incarnation The form as we know it appears for the first timeaccording to J. Fournée in his The History of the Angelus. The Angel's Message to Mary (Lev, 1997)in The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium parvum BMV), printed in Rome during the time of Pope Pius V (1566-1572), and also in the Manuale catholicorum (Handbook for Catholics) by the Jesuit St Peter Canisius, published in Antwerp in 1588. In older manuals of devotion, according to the date of their publication, the Angelus may mention Pope Benedict XIV (14 September 1742) and Pope Leo XIII (15 March 1884) as its great promoters. Artists have shaped our image of the Annunciation: Mary at prayer or in meditation at the angel's coming The greatest artists have chosen to immortalize this moment: Mary is usually shown kneeling or seated and sometimes has a book in her hand or nearby. The tradition preferred in the West and known in the East only because of Western influence (see the 16th century Mount Athos frescoes) likes to visualize Mary meditating on the Bible, and more precisely, according to the suppositions of the Fathers of the Church, on the passage by the prophet Isaiah (7,14): "Behold, a virgin will conceive …", or reading the psalter, as reported in the Meditationes vitae Christi (Meditations on the Life of Christ), a book dear to late medieval artists. Among the earliest works representing the Annunciation, we can mention the frescoes of Giotto (ca. 1305 in the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua) and the panel painting by Simone Martini (1333, Uffizi, Florence). And we should not forget Fra Angelico's Annunciation in the Convent of San Marco in Florence (ca. 1440), the one by Leonardo (ca. 1475, Uffizi), or The Angelus by Millet (1857-59, Louvre, Paris).
Taken from: L'Osservatore Romano Weekly Edition in English 4 September 2002, page 6

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Vatican News 1:30 PM

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Catholic Music

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Music is meant to stir the soul, especially Catholic music. Contemporary Catholic music as well as Liturgical Catholic music inspires Catholic listeners of all ages. Catholic music has always been a critical aspect of the Catholic Church. As far back as the origins of Gregorian chants and other forms of Catholic musical praise, the Catholic Church has always stressed the power and importance of musical worship. To further stress the value of Catholic music, the Roman Catholic Church named St. Cecilia the patroness of Catholic musicians and Catholic music, and celebrates her feast day on November 22. Since Vatican Council II Catholic music has become more open to popular cultural influences. This has brought about themed Catholic music such as Catholic jazz, Catholic rock, Catholic pop and even Catholic hip-hop. Modern Catholic musicians have also used their artistic talents to revive and reinforce more traditional Catholic Liturgical music. Catholics are blessed to have great musical talent in a variety of Catholic music genres, covering specific liturgical seasons, holidays and for everyday enjoyment.
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